I stayed in bed for over an hour
looked at things on my phone
I felt slightly anxious about nothing particular
I walked downstairs and poured coffee into a jar
I asked a person on the internet if I should take drugs
I took drugs before the person had time to respond

I feel alienated by people who express concern about me without
defining their concern in terms of a specific solution or goal
I dont feel comforted by the idea of an afterlife
I dont want to continue experiencing things after I die
I want someone to pull my hair because I like the idea of someone
controlling my head without touching my head

what is the difference between being an independent person
and being a person who is accepting of loneliness

“Today My Alarm Went Off at 12:30 p.m.,” Mira Gonzalez  (via sentimentalvibrations)

(via anniegetyourdress)

Jun 20, 2014 / 25,145 notes
Jun 18, 2014 / 1,325 notes
The body of humanity seeks to create a new immune constitution in an electronic medial skin.
Peter Sloterdijk, ‘Spheres, Vol. I: Bubbles - Microspherology’ (via aidsnegligee)
Jun 18, 2014 / 4 notes
Jun 13, 2014 / 10 notes

(via harinef)

Jun 10, 2014

new project

May 24, 2014 / 1,221 notes
May 23, 2014 / 8 notes
corwood:

In 1948, John Cage joined the faculty of Black Mountain College, where he regularly worked on collaborations with Merce Cunningham. Around this time, he visited the anechoic chamber at Harvard University. An anechoic chamber is a room designed in such a way that the walls, ceiling and floor will absorb all sounds made in the room, rather than bouncing them back as echoes. They are also generally soundproofed.
Cage entered the chamber expecting to hear silence, but as he wrote later, he “heard two sounds, one high and one low. When I described them to the engineer in charge, he informed me that the high one was my nervous system in operation, the low one my blood in circulation.” 
Cage had gone to a place where he expected there to be no sound, and yet sound was nevertheless discernible. He stated “until I die there will be sounds. And they will continue following my death. One need not fear about the future of music.”
May 21, 2014 / 416 notes

corwood:

In 1948, John Cage joined the faculty of Black Mountain College, where he regularly worked on collaborations with Merce Cunningham. Around this time, he visited the anechoic chamber at Harvard University. An anechoic chamber is a room designed in such a way that the walls, ceiling and floor will absorb all sounds made in the room, rather than bouncing them back as echoes. They are also generally soundproofed.

Cage entered the chamber expecting to hear silence, but as he wrote later, he “heard two sounds, one high and one low. When I described them to the engineer in charge, he informed me that the high one was my nervous system in operation, the low one my blood in circulation.”

Cage had gone to a place where he expected there to be no sound, and yet sound was nevertheless discernible. He stated “until I die there will be sounds. And they will continue following my death. One need not fear about the future of music.”

(via notational)

"Why should I spoil my book?" she had thought. All the same she felt terribly down for some reason. And yet, she told herself, "I bet if you met that man he would be awfully ordinary, just like everybody else." It was something about his small, neat, precise handwriting that made her think so. But it was always the most ordinary things that suddenly turned round and showed you another face, a terrifying face. That was the hidden horror, the horror everybody pretended did not exist, the horror that was responsible for all the other horrors.
Jean Rhys, “The Insect World”
May 20, 2014
May 20, 2014 / 1,193 notes

tarkovskologist:

"… At times something happens and I stop dreaming of the house and the pine trees of my childhood around it. Then i get depressed. And i can’t wait to see this dream in which I’ll be a child again and feel happy again because everything will still be ahead, everything will be possible." — Zerkalo (1975)

(via mgira)

May 20, 2014 / 4 notes
May 20, 2014 / 103 notes

(via love-less)

She could give herself up to the written word as naturally as a good dancer to music or a fine swimmer to water. The only difficulty was that after finishing the last sentence she was left with a feeling at once hollow and uncomfortably full. Exactly like indigestion. It was perhaps for this reason that she never forgot that books were one thing and that life was another.
Jean Rhys, “The Insect World”
May 20, 2014 / 1 note
Menstrual pads have been mentioned as early as the 10th century, in the Suda, where Hypatia, who lived in the 4th century AD, was said to have thrown one of her used menstrual rags at an admirer in an attempt to discourage him
May 20, 2014 / 71,409 notes
May 20, 2014 / 811 notes

(via qarcon)